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Liberals impose politics on 'Samurai Jack'

It often features racist caricatures

 Source: YouTube

Complaints that "Samurai Jack," a special and profound cartoon, engages in cultural appropriation are misplaced, believes Jack Butler of the National Review. He denounces critics of the show as nitpicky and oversensitive. In particular, fans that were outraged by Jack kissing antagonist Ashi due to hopes of her being lesbian seem to deny the show’s creator the right to his own characters’ sexuality. Their kiss enriched both of their personalities as well as the plot. Butler sees this as a regressive trend among liberals, seeking to impose their own sexually revolutionary narrative on a cartoon.

Keep on reading at National Review

The cartoon "Samurai Jack" has made use of characters that have engaged in stereotypical behavior, tainting the stunning show’s reputation, infers Sam Kruyer of the Yale Herald. In his opinion, the show has appropriated Japanese culture with an overly simplistic portrayal of samurais with racist caricatures like the character “Da Samurai.” Female bodies are hyper-sexualized in a way that undermines their personalities, according to Kruyer. He suggests that "Samurai Jack"’s use of antiquated and out-of-touch tropes and perpetuation of bigoted stereotypes hurt the show.

Keep on reading at the Yale Herald
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