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Was Devin Nunes justified in compromising the Russia case?

House Intel Chair Compromised Russia case

Devin Nunes was justified in briefing Trump

 Getty Images: Mark Wilson

Devin Nunes, the Republican chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, which is investigating whether Russia interfered with the 2016 presidential election, has compromised the investigation. Instead of concentrating on finding facts, he is acting as a surrogate for the Trump administration, rebutting news, looking for leaks, and inappropriately briefing the president on the case’s progress, writes the Editorial Board in USA Today. Nunes' decision to bring new evidence about communictions involving Trump's transition team incidentally being picked up during US servelliance of forigeners directly about to the president instead of to the top Democrat on his panel, shows that his loyalty is to Trump and not to the bipartisan panel and investigation. Nunes lacks independence and integry that such an investigation requires, which undermines the public’s confidence, adds USA Today.

Keep on reading at USA Today

Republican Chairman of the House Intelligence Committee Devin Nunes said he had a duty and obligation to brief President Trump on new information regarding the ongoing investigation into whether there was any collusion between the president’s campaign and Russia leading up to the election. Whether Nunes was justified or not to bypass his fellow Democrat chairman of the Committee, he has raised a very valid concern by making public that communications by members of Trump’s transition team had been picked up incidentally during U.S. surveillance of foreigners, writes Jim Geraghty. Nunes is justified in pointing out that it's illegal for people within the U.S. government to leak classified information and that we’re embarking on a dangerous road when information collected by U.S. intelligence agencies about American citizens starts getting strategically and illegally leaked for partisan purposes.

Keep on reading at National Review
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