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Should the National Census Ask About Citizenship?

It's wrong and politically motivated

It's justified; illegals shouldn't take part

 Getty: Alex Wong / Staff

The government’s decision to ask for citizenship status in the national census is an effort to undermine an essential part of US democracy for political gain, argues the editorial board of The New York Times. The census is necessary as it determines how many House seats, and how much federal funding, a state receives. This would empower Republican areas and weaken Democratic ones. The argument that it would allow the government to better protect minorities’ rights is fallacious as it will reduce the census responses by minority voters. This would reduce funding of more diverse areas while going against Constitutional norms.

Keep on reading at the New York Times

The decision to ask people about their citizenship in the national census is justified, holds Charles Hurt of The Washington Times. Illegal immigrants taking part in the census dilutes the representation of real Americans. They are breaking the law by being in the country and shouldn’t be taking part in a census by the US government to find out more about its citizens. The criticism from liberal politicians is deeply misplaced and likely motivated by trying to increase their own representation in Congress. There is a line between asserting the rights of American minorities and protecting illegal immigrants. The change still allows the former to happen.

Keep on reading at the Washington Times
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