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Does The Media’s Coverage Of Suicide Inspire Others?

Media coverage inspires more suicides

Done right, it can lower suicide rates

 Getty: Mike Coppola / Staff

The media’s detailed coverage of many celebrities’ suicides, like that of Robin Williams, has worsened the issue by inspiring others, holds Liz Spikol of The Philadelphia Inquirer. Many outlets don’t understand that sometimes graphic information about how a famous person killed themselves can lead to others doing the same. Kate Spade, who killed herself in June 2018, is said to have been very involved in the media’s coverage of Williams’ 2014 suicide. News companies should avoid sensationalizing these tragedies. How a person killed themselves should not be described in detail. Too few outlets understand this and worsen the problem.

Keep on reading at The Philadelphia Inquirer

News coverage of suicide is not necessarily a bad thing, as it can lead to vital awareness and discussions of the subject, believes Syliva Stead of The Globe and Mail. Especially when covered along the recommended guidelines, by respecting privacy and avoiding too much detail, it can be a force for good. According to one line of thought, media coverage influences the method of suicide, not the likelihood of someone killing themselves. Discussing the issue and making people understand how dangerous and pervasive it is can lead to fewer deaths. Many outlets inform readers about ways to contact someone and deal with potential suicidal thoughts.

Keep on reading at The Globe and Mail
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