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Should You Lie To Your Kids About Santa?

It can be a pleasant illusion

It can ruin kids' trust in parents

 Getty: Bennett Raglin / Stringer

Maintaining the myth of Santa Claus in one’s household can be very positive for children, holds Kristen Dunfield of The Conversation. Kids becoming old enough to figure out that Santa’s existence is unlikely can be a good learning experience. If this is the only big lie parents tell their children, trust will probably remain intact. Upon their discovery that he doesn’t exist, it is usually the parents that feel worse. Children might feel satisfaction from finding this out. It can be a productive step in their development. Finding out that Santa doesn’t exist is not the traumatic experience that some believe.

Keep on reading at The Conversation

Lying to one’s children about Santa Claus existing can be bad for them, asserts John Von Radowitz of The Independent. The feeling of betrayal when finding out that this was a lie can negatively affect a child’s trust in their parents. Parents’ urge to create the illusion of Santa isn’t usually motivated by thoughts of their children, but a desire to recreate their own childhoods. Discovering that this significant story, which spanned years, wasn't true can lead kids to doubt other things they have been told about, such as God. Undermining kids' trust in their parents in this way is damaging.

Keep on reading at the Independent
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